The Definitive Guide to Holiday Wine

Definitive Guide to Holiday WineThis story was originally published in the Winter 2014 issue of Austin Man Magazine. It looks fantastic in print, so grab an issue or two. 

December is stuffed with more parties, festive meals and holiday get-togethers than anyone can possibly manage. Getting in the way of that merriment is the mad scramble to meet year-end work deadlines, extra family obligations and the dreaded burden of shopping for gifts. The last thing you need is the extra stress of figuring out what kind of wine to buy for dinners and parties. Relax. We’ve got you covered. Here is your map and compass for navigating holiday wine shopping.

Ready Set Pop the Cork

PERFECT PARINGS: PICKING WINE FOR YOUR HOLIDAY MEALS

Holiday dinners can be a cacophony of conflicting tastes with several dishes demanding your tongue’s attention. Selecting the right wine to pair with diverse dishes like ham, goose, turkey or prime rib and truffled creamed spinach, scalloped potatoes and cranberry relish is downright daunting. The three keys to success are:

Pick a variety of versatile wines, make sure you have enough and don’t be a Scrooge.

Sparkling wine is a sommelier’s clutch wine for crazy food pairings. No matter what is served with it, those festive bubbles perk up the palate and put a smile on your face. The characteristic that makes bubbly so food-friendly is its high acidity. Several styles of white and elegant, refined red wine share that same trait.

Don’t be caught with thirsty guests. It’s safe to plan to serve one bottle for every two people at the table (two if I’m on your guest list).

Marc Hebrart Rose Sparkling

 

The best way to start off any holiday celebration is with a kiss under the mistletoe, quickly followed by a lovely Champagne toast. It’s a perfect mate with soft, creamy cheeses; curvy mounds of mashed potatoes and just about any luscious dish you encounter.

Marc Hébrart N.V. Premier Cru Brut Rosé, Mareuil-sur-Aÿ de la Marne NV. As exhilarating as a kiss with a strawberry tucked in her lips, the vivacious bubbles and lush, layered berry flavors of this rosé satisfy. Intense, complex flavors riding an edge of tremendous acidity and minerality make it extremely versatile with food. It’s a bargain for $45.

White

Serving holiday dinner without a white wine is like watching old reruns of Sex in the City without your girlfriend. You just wouldn’t do it. Put food-friendly sauvignon blanc on your shopping list.


2013 Fall Creek Vineyards Sauvignon Blanc
. This is a beautiful Texas wine that you might mistake for French. Locals and out-of-town visitors will both appreciate an enchanting local wine with fresh scents of honeysuckle and green apples, and bold flavors of lemon zest, peach and apricot. It’s perfect for savory, spicy and sweet dishes alike, at $12.

Red

 

Holiday WineThat shimmering Christmas goose or succulent turkey breast might make you crave white wine, but pinot noir will give it wings. Its bracing acidity, sumptuous fruit and soft tannins make it the perfect bedfellow with not only fowl, but also just about anything. Pinot noir is elegant and complex without being fussy.

2012 Starmont Stanly Ranch Estate Pinot Noir, Carneros. Only 214 cases were made of this exquisite wine, made with handpicked grapes from a single vineyard. Vivid violet scents marry with tart red plum, cherry, strawberry, caramel and cedar flavors. Its velvety texture has the right balance of acidity, smooth tannins and light alcohol to let the fruit flavors ease into a long finish with toasty fig and vanilla. Pick it up for $55 a bottle. When a holiday feast calls for a big red meat beast, nothing fits the bill quite like a sumptuous cabernet sauvignon.

2011 Merryvale Profile, Napa Valley. Serving the signature wine from this storied St. Helena winery will signal to your guests that you mean business. Only 957 cases were made of this family-owned estate wine with fruit grown on the east-facing hillside of Spring Valley. The 2011 is a blend of cab, cabernet franc, petit verdot and malbec, giving it brooding flavors of plum, blackberry, black cherry and dark chocolate. Bring on the tenderloin or beef Wellington. This spicy treasure with grippy tannins will bring out the best in any rich dish. It runs $175 a bottle.

HOLIDAY PARTY WINE-BUYING GUIDE

Holiday parties are fun, and buying the wine for them can be almost as enjoyable. Take the stress out of planning the wine for your party with these simple tips.

Get the Right Amount. Figuring out how much wine to buy is as simple as understanding how many servings are in a bottle, how much your guests will drink and the number of guests you expect.

Step 1: Serving size

  • One 750-milileter bottle = five 5-ounce servings
  • One case (12 750-milileter bottles) = 60 servings

Step 2: Consumption average

  • Assume guests at a holiday party will knock back two glasses of wine per hour.

Step 3: Simple equation

  • One hour at two glasses per person x 10 guests = four bottles of wine. Extrapolate from there.

Get the Right Mix. If your party begins before 5 p.m., get a mix that includes 40 percent sparkling wine, 30 percent white wine and 30 percent red wine. If your party starts after 5 p.m., your mix should include 30 percent sparkling wine, 20 percent white wine and 50 percent red wine.

Get the Right Wines. It’s always nice to pick crowd-pleaser wines that are both versatile with food and recognizable. Buying full cases will typically land a 15 percent discount.

SPARKLING WINE CHOICES

Prosecco From Italy. If you like a slightly less fizzy and sweeter wine, try Italian Prosecco. It’s made with the Charmat method, in which the secondary fermentation takes place in stainless-steel tanks rather than in the bottle. Prosecco is readily available at prices that won’t kill your budget. Delicious wines to consider are Nino Franco Rustico, La Marca Prosecco and Enrico Brut.

Cava From Spain. Spanish sparkling wine called Cava is typically made using the same traditional method as Champagne, but with different grapes. It’s known for its high acidity, fresh-cut citrus and melon flavors, and lighterstyle body. Both the white and rosé Cavas are dry (not sweet) and refreshing. Excellent bargains are easy to find. Try Juvé y Camps Brut Rosé, Gramona III Lustros or Segura Viudas.

Sparkling Wine From the U.S. Domestic bubbles typically deliver great value. American sparkling wines are typically rounder and mouth filling. Quality American bubbles are made in the traditional method in California, Oregon, Washington and even lesser known wine-producing states like New Mexico and North Carolina. Some solid choices are Scharffenberger, Argyle Brut and Roederer Estate.

Champagne From France. If you go for Champagne, you will spend a little extra. It’s worth it. To get the best bang for your buck, consider grower-producer Champagne, meaning wine made by the same house that grows as much as 88 percent of their own grapes. Look for a tiny RM on the label. Small growers are able to control their crops and the quality of the product by bottling their own. Put Billecart-Salmon, Pierre Gimonnet & Fils and Guy Charlemagne high on your list.

WHITE WINE CHOICES

Chardonnay From France. Chardonnay is extremely popular, and also pairs well with a wide variety of foods. Consider Bourgogne blanc wines from producers like Joseph Drouhin or Bouchard Père et Fils. Chablis and Mâcon are outstanding growing areas of Burgundy, making crisp yet creamy wines with ripe peach, lemon peel and honeysuckle flavors. Try Domaine Daniel Dampt and Domaine Guillot-Broux.

Sauvignon Blanc From the U.S. or New Zealand. Zippy, light and refreshing sauvignon blanc is always a crowd pleaser and readily available at great prices. Juicy wines from New Zealand shimmer with lime, grapefruit and edgy jalapeño pepper. Cloudy Bay, Kim Crawford and Greywacke are good bets. U.S.-made sauvignon blanc has the same bracing citrus flavors as its New Zealand sisters, but trades fresh-cut grass for the jalapeño. Solid producers include Matanzas Creek, Galerie and Cliff Lede.

RED WINE CHOICES

Syrah Blends From France. The Côtes du Rhône region of France produces earthy, fruity and food-friendly wines made with a mix of grapes, including grenache, syrah and mourvedre. The medium-bodied wines pack bold flavors of blackberry, licorice, herb and black olive on a graphite backbone. They are great on their own or go well with a wide variety of holiday nibbles. Saint Cosme Côtes du- Rhône Rouge and Domaine d’Andezon Côtes du Rhône are solid wines to consider.

Cabernet Sauvignon From Chile or Australia. Cab is king in the familiarity column. Bordeaux and California cabernet are some of the most sought-after wines in the world. To get similar pizzazz with less impact on the wallet, go for wines made in Chile and Australia. Chilean cabs pair dark fruit and chocolate flavors with herbal and peppery tastes. Strong choices are Santa Rita, De Martino and Montes. Australian cabs are powerful, with rich black currant and cedar flavors. Try Ringbolt and Penfolds.

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WHAT ARE YOU DRINKING’S PAIRING GUIDE

Red Wines

Pairing Guide

 

White Wines

Pairing Guide White

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Thanksgiving wine guide: Perfect pairings for morning, noon and night

I love Thanksgiving. It’s a fantastic day to enjoy the company of family and friends, reflect on the best parts of our lives, and break out bottle after bottle of delicious wine.

With a complex meal (and a long day of gluttony), Thanksgiving offers the perfect opportunity to open lots of wines to pair with different dishes and please plenty of palates. Follow this schedule and you are sure to have a fantastic wine day.

Murphy-Goode ChardonnayLate morning
Chardonnay. Meal prep will be in full swing, and it is simply impossible to cook without wine. A dash for the dish, a swig for you. The Detroit Lions vs. Chicago Bears game kicks off at 11:30 am, and that game certainly could use liquid accompaniment to make it more interesting.

Why Chardonnay? Because it’s versatile with almost any food on the Thanksgiving table, it’s easy to find at fine wine shops and corner stores alike, and your mother-in-law and great uncle love it. Give your relatives a reason to be thankful by serving a wine they will recognize early in the day.

Try Murphy-Goode 2013 Single Deck Chardonnay. This single vineyard Russian River wine has ripe pear, tropical fruit and vanilla flavors. Keep a few extra bottles on hand to make sure you have some left to serve at dinner. It will pair well with the turkey. You can find Murphy-Goode wines at Twin Liquors. The Single Deck Chardonnay goes for $30 a bottle online.

Mid-afternoon  
Sparkling wine. Dinner is almost ready. The savory aroma of turkey is the kitchen’s siren song, tempting you to spoil your appetite by binging on snacks. It’s better to satiate that desire with crisp, frolicking bubbly rather than eating tons of Chex mix. The Dallas Cowboys vs. Philadelphia Eagles game kicks off at 3:30 pm and America’s Team deserves a toast with sparkling wine.

Why bubbles? Because nothing screams holiday celebration like sparkling wine. It’s hard for your significant other to be mad at you for stealing bites of the turkey skin before dinner when you hand over a gorgeous flute of bubbles. Whether you pick Champagne, Cava, U.S. sparkling wine, Sekt or Prosecco, bubbles give everyone a grin. Buy a double-bottle magnum or two so you have plenty of sparkling to last the afternoon and to serve at dinner.

Try Argyle Vintage Brut 2011. This Oregon stunner is easy to find, reasonably priced and packs zillions of tiny bubbles bursting with apple blossom, lemon zest, toasted almond and pear flavors. Argyle will have your cousin raising a glass to toast everyone in the room. Spec’s sells it for $22 a bottle. A magnum will set you back $60.

Scacciadiavoli Sagrantino di Montefalco 2007Dinner time
Italian red. The table is loaded with an incredible array of foods from creamy green bean casserole and buttery mashed potatoes to savory stuffing and the luscious turkey. Make sure you put the Chardonnay and sparkling wine on the table, but red wine needs a spot too.

Why Italian red? Because you’ve served Pinot Noir at Thanksgiving for the past 10 years straight and it’s time to have a little fun. Italian red wine with fresh acidity loves the rich fat of dark meat and gravy. The bold wines from the town of Montefalco in the Umbria region pack a punch for a decent price. The earthy, spicy wines won’t get lost in the cacophony of flavors in the feast.

Try Scacciadiavoli Sagrantino di Montefalco 2007. Made with the Sagrantino grape, this wine has bold scents of graphite, dried lavender, cranberry and lovely raspberry and red plum flavors with aromatic herbs. It’s well balanced with bright acidity and firm tannins giving it a long spicy finish. It sells for $37 at East End Wines.

Chateau du Tariquet VS ClassiqueEvening
Armagnac. After you’ve managed to kill an entire pecan pie and half a pumpkin pie by yourself, the only thing to do is to kick back on the couch next to the fire with a glass of Armagnac.

Why Armagnac? Because this French brandy from the small region of Gascony is less expensive yet every bit as good as its more recognizable cousin, cognac. It’s also a bit fuller figured than cognac, which is completely fitting on Thanksgiving. It is made with distilled white wine grapes and then aged in local black oak casks. It hides its brawny 80 proof alcohol in velvet, so sip it slowly.

Try Chateau du Tariquet VS Classique. Produced at the estate which has been family run since 1912, Chateau du Tariquet has the elegance and finesse that is a hallmark of the Bas-Armagnac appellation in the far north of Armagnac. The “VS” on the bottle means it has been aged a minimum of two years, leaving it with a light golden color.

Serve it neat at room temperature in a brandy snifter or a tulip-shaped glass. Swirl it to let the full aroma of the heady vapors release. It fills the nose with racy spice, butterscotch and cinnamon, but don’t sniff too deeply or the 40 percent alcohol will singe your nostrils. Let the first sip wash across your tongue to take in the raisin, roasted apple and caramel flavors finishing with a sweet kiss of chocolate and liquorice. It’s love in a glass.

Don’t worry if you don’t have enough guests to finish the whole bottle. Armagnac doesn’t go bad after you’ve opened it. It will be good to drink next Thanksgiving. Pick it up for $35 at the Austin Wine Merchant.

This story was originally published on CultureMap

Disclosure: sample wines were provided by Murphy-Goode, Scacciadiavoli and  Chateau du Tariquet. 

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Thanksgiving Wine Picks: Why Not Serve Pinot Noir with Turkey this Year?

Thanksgiving wine recommendationThis article originally appeared in the November issue of Austin Woman Magazine, and it looks way better in print.  Photo by Rudy Arocha; Platter, wine glasses and runner available at Breed & Company, 718 W. 29th St., 512.474.6679; Cheeses compliments of Antonelli’s Cheese Shop, 4220 Duval St., 512.53.9610; Wine available at Twin Liquors.

This year, Thanksgiving falls on the first day of Hanukkah. It’s hard enough to pick the perfect wine for Thanksgiving dinner, but for families celebrating both holidays, it’s even trickier. A surefire key to success is selecting more than one type of wine. Bubbles are a must on the table, and it is also a great idea to have an elegant, refined red wine. A complex menu like those served at traditional Thanksgiving and Hanukkah begs for versatile wines.

Sparkling wine is as adaptable as a little black dress during holiday party season. No matter what foods you serve with it, those festive bubbles perk up the palate and put you in a good mood. Sparkling wine also has high levels of acid that cut through any rich and fatty foods like mashed potatoes with gravy or fried latkes.

You might not think of red wine when you gaze at that succulent turkey breast, but pinot noir deserves a seat at your table. Its lush fruit, mild alcohol and soft tannins give it the versatility to pair well with not only turkey, but also with red meats and just about any dish. Pinot noir is the ultimate svelte, elegant, complex wine, and red Burgundy is the best there is in the category.

Similarly, the Syrah-driven wines of the Côtes du Rhône region of France are earthy, fruity and foodfriendly wines. Unlike some of your relatives, these wines won’t dominate the conversation—or the food. The subtle, medium-bodied wines go with white meat or a traditional Hanukkah brisket equally as well.

Whether you are cooking at home or attending dinner at a friend’s house, plan to have one bottle of each for every two people. As a guest, you might not need to supply all the wine, but you should always bring a bottle of something to augment the host’s supply. It’s a nice gift if it isn’t served.

Here are my bubbly and red recommendations for your holiday feast:

Bargain Bubbly: Gruet Brut Non Vintage French Champagne may be the standardbearer for sophisticated bubbles, but domestic bubbly typically delivers better value. Quality American sparkling wines are made in the traditional method in California, Oregon, Washington and even New Mexico. French Champagne maker Gilbert Gruet moved to New Mexico in the early 1980s to make Gruet sparkling wine. Gruet brut is bright with flavors of apple, grapefruit, a hint of lemon zest and an edge of stony minerals that make it a natural dance partner with any food. Pick it up at Twin Liquors for $15.

Splurge Bubbly: Marc Hébrart N.V. Premier Cru Brut Rosé, Mareuil-sur-Aÿ This Premier Cru rosé from the small French Champagne grower/producer Marc Hébrart is as refined and silky as you would expect from a Grand Cru. Its gorgeous salmon color and streaming bubbles are a delightful visual accompaniment to any table. It has a nice balance of fruit and earth with fresh apple, strawberries and funky goat-cheese scent. It finishes with crisp minerals and tart acidity. It’s a steal for $55, available by order at Austin Wine Merchant.

Bargain Red: Domaine d’Andezon Côtes du Rhône 2011 Domaine d’Andezon from the Southern Rhône tastes like a much more expensive wine made in one of the more prestigious regions to the North. This blend of mostly Syrah and Grenache has rich violet color and lush black fruit and wildflower aromas. The blackberry, licorice, herb and black-olive flavors are balanced with graphite minerality. It pairs well with duck, venison and brisket. It is available at Twin Liquors for about $15.

Splurge Red: Faiveley Gevrey-Chambertin 1er Cru “Clos des Issarts” 2010 The famed wine village of Gevrey-Chambertin in the Burgundy region of France produces some of the world’s most sought-after Premier and Grand Cru wines. The Faiveley has rich extraction, resulting in a dark ruby color. It has opulent, long-lasting scents of forests, fennel and ripe cherries. The well-balanced wine tastes of cherries, strawberries, mocha and dried mushroom. It has a silky texture, despite the racy acidity and firm tannins. It is elegance in a bottle for $95 at the Austin Wine Merchant.

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Starting with wine at Chefs Under Fire

The Austin/San Antonio regional semi-final of Chefs Under Fire was held tonight in Austin. The final battle of the chefs will be held on October 16 at the AT&T Executive Center. What am I doing blogging about a foodie event? It opened with a VIP reception hosted by Bill Elsey, who was recently crowned Best Sommelier in Texas at TexSom. How could I miss that?

Bill is no stranger to food and wine events. Not only does he host them at work as the director of sales at Duchman Family Winery, but he also attends them as a fan. He and Diane Dixon, co-founder of Keeper Collection, the organizers of Chefs Under Fire and Somms Under Fire, met  through a wine tasting group hosted by the  Wine and Food Foundation of Texas. They hit it off and he was officially invited to host the pre-event VIP tasting after he won Sommelier of the Year at TexSom.

Here is what Bill poured tonight.    

Étoile Brut, Domain Chandon

This easy going sparkler is aged sur lees (on the yeast) for five years giving it a nice mellow, nutty flavor.

Look Slight straw with steady stream of bubbles
Smell It has a delightful scent of French bread and green apples.  
Taste A great way to start an evening with fresh, vibrant flavors of toast, green apple, nutmeg and hint of citrusy, zippy effervescence. Crisp, light and delightfully ready to wakeup taste buds for a night of fine food.

 

2009 Château de Sancerre

Fairies delivered this delightful gem from the Loire Valley with pixie dust and dreams. Have you ever met a fairy? No? That’s because they’re understated, and not all up in yo grill. The same way this Sauvignon Blanc is compared to its New Zealand or California cousins.

Look Late morning sunshine, bight and pale yellow shimmer in the glass.
Smell A nose full of kiwi, lemon, daffodil and limestone greet you and beg you to take a sip.
Taste Vivacious citrus sunshine slides across a slate slab with nice acidity and pep to greet the palate with a sassiness balanced with subtlety. Fruit, balanced with acidity and minerality. Pert, crisp and ready to go.  

 

2009 Dolcetto d’ Alba

(OK, I didn’t get the producer. Shame on me. Sorry, but I got caught up in the festivities)

Look Royal amethyst purple shimmering and inviting.
Smell This puppy has a distinctive nose of cranberry rolled in soy and balsamic vinegar. Fruity and tart.
Taste Light and chipper cherry pit with pecan and vanilla.  

 

No matter whether you are preparing award winning food, or if you are simply preparing a quick dinner, these three food friendly wines will hit the spot.

Chefs Under Fire pitted excellent, up and coming chefs in a competition to see who can make the most excellent dish from a list of ingredients disclosed at the start of the competition. I’m so glad I wasn’t put in that place. I just stop by and enjoyed the wine. Thanks Keeper Collection for another amazing event.

What are you drinking?

Budget Bubbles: Select a Delicious Sparkling Wine for your Holiday Party

Champagne is synonymous with celebration. There is something special about a tall, slender champagne flute with tiny bubbles streaming to the surface like thousands of balloons released to the gods, like so many comic thought bubbles floating over a crowd and bursting into fits of laughter. Any holiday party is incomplete without a toast with bubbles. Don’t send your guests home sobbing like unfulfilled children with coal in their stockings on Christmas morning, serve sparkling wine for Chrissakes.

Don’t despair if your wallet is a bit moth-eaten and too slim to cover for the expensive stuff from the Champagne region of France, there are plenty of lovely sparkling wines that can meet your budget. Sparkling wine goes by lots of different names, depending on where it’s produced. In the U.S., we have the evocative name, sparking wine. Other names around the world include Mousseux or Crémant in France, but not from Champagne; Prosecco, Trento and Asti in Italy; Cava in Spain; Sekt in Germany  and Austria; Espumante in Portugal, and Cap Classique in South Africa.

Here are a few tips for choosing a sparkling wine:

  1. Go to a reputable wine shop and get advice from the smart people that work there. They spend all day, every day recommending wine to people like us and are a great resource for finding the best wine for the money.
  2. Steer clear of Cold Duck.
  3. Look for the words “méthode Champenoise,” “traditional method” or “méthode traditionnelle” on the bottle. This signifies that the sparkling wine was made with the most complex of the four methods for making bubbly. When selecting an Italian wine, completely disregard this tip and instead look for “Metodo Charmat-Martinotti” or “Metodo Italiano.” This will ensure that you don’t get a horrid bottle of rot gut made with an injection of CO2 like the aforementioned Cold Duck. This method guarantees you will get a horrendous headache in the morning and you’ll be in desperate need of my hangover helpers.

If you still want a little help in picking a delightful sparkling wine for your holiday party, never fear, I have three recommendations for you. Beautiful Wife and I did your homework for you. We tasted three bubblies priced $10, $15 and $18 and here is your cheat sheet for wine shopping.

Valdivieso Champenoise Brut Nature

Our first wine is our least expensive and comes from the venerable Viña Valdivieso winery in the Curico Valley of Chile. The winery’s claim to fame is that it has evolved from the first company in South America to make sparkling wine, Champagne Valdivieso founded by Alberto Valdivieso in 1879.

Valdivieso Champenoise Brut Nature is made in the traditional method with 60 percent Chardonnay and 40 percent Pinot Noir. This wine is aged 24 months with yeast in the bottle. The wine makers achieve an elegant dryness by adding no additional sugar in the dosage when the bottle is topped off after disgorgement. Here are my tasting notes.

Look Like bright spun gold, with a hint of pale salmon at the edge, studded with millions of tiny diamonds. Valdivies has abundant fine bubbles and a soft mousse.
Smell A glass of delicate lemon meringue pie accompanied by a thin slice of green apple.
Taste A creamy, smooth holiday treat of tart green apple, toasty bread crust and a long finish with hints of bitter pecan.
Price $10

After the official tasting, we finished this bottle first. It has the smoothness, complexity and brightness that we like in a sparkling wine. At 10 bucks a bottle it’s a steal. We grabbed a bunch of it for our holiday parties and pop-in guests.

Crémant d’Alsace Brut Lucien Albrecht

Next up, a French-styled wine from Domain Lucien Albrecht in the village of Orschwihr in southern Alsace. This place has some serious wine history, records of wine production dating back to 728 AD.

Crémant d’Alsace Brut Lucien Albrecht is made from 100 percent Pinot Blanc grapes grown in clay-chalky soil. It is made méthode Champenoise with malolactic fermentation. Here is what you can expect.

Look Northern sunlight on a December afternoon, pale yellow, bright and transparent. This one has slightly larger bubbles than the first streaming with mid frequency for a gentle mousse that disappeared quickly.
Smell A cold winter’s day with dusty, minerally limestone and faint honey suckle.
Taste A bite of fresh grape fruit and tapioca with a silky-smooth, balanced feel. The Lucien Albrecht has a mid-length, slightly bitter finish.
Price $15

This was my third favorite of the three, but is a wine I have bought before and will buy again. The crisp

Carpene Malvoliti DOCG Prosecco Cuvée Brut

Carpene Malvoliti is one of the largest producers of Prosecco and has been making the bubbly from grapes grown in the DOCG hills of Conegliano and Valdobbiadene Veneto  region of Italy since 1868.

Carpene Malvoliti DOCG Prosecco Cuvée Brut is made from 100 percent Glera, aka Prosecco, grapes with the Charmat- Martinotti method, which puts more emphasis on the fruit by aging it for only three months on the yeast. This wine is the epitome of Prosecco with medium effervescence and round fruit flavors. This is what it tastes like:

Look The glint of light from the star on the top of your Christmas tree, light straw yellow with slightly larger bubbles than the other two wines. The slow rolling bubbles generate a generous mousse.
Smell A Christmas fruitcake with peach pits, toasted apples and floral scents.  My 7 year old son confirmed the peach and apple notes.
Taste Full, lush peach juice dribbling down your chin balanced by tingly bubbles, slight acidity and a smooth, clean, long finish.
Price $18

Prosecco is a food lover’s wine and pairs well with anything on your table. It’s also great all by itself. The Carpene Malvoliti is a solid wine, but for $8 less I can buy a lot more of the Valdivieso to serve at a big party.

Any of these three sparkling wines are good selections to serve during the holidays or any time of the year. They are delicious on their own, go well with food and are good in mixed drinks like mimosas or a festive Poinsettia Cocktail. What’s a Poinsettia Cocktail you ask? Here’s how you make this simple, festive drink:

  • Healthy measure of Sparkling wine
  • 1/2 oz. Cointreau
  • ½ oz. Vodka
  • 3 oz. Cranberry Juice

Add chilled Cointreau, vodka and cranberry to chilled champagne glass. Give it a quick swizzle and top that gorgeous princess with with sparkling wine or Champagne just before serving. Now that says holiday a heck of a lot better than a roasted chestnut on Santa’s lap.

Happy Holidays!

What are you drinking?