What to drink in Austin right now: Two local spirits put a new spin on gin

Austin Reserve Gin Single Barrel Series
Austin Reserve Gin Single Barrel Series


Gin starts life as a wallflower. In the beginning, it is nothing more than colorless, odorless, flavorless liquor, sort of like vodka. Then it is distilled again with a mix of juniper berries and other herbs that transform it into an aromatic, sophisticated spirit.

As gorgeous and complex as gin is, it takes on an even more interesting tone when it spends some quality time with oak. Like barrel-aged whiskey, it takes on a comely amber hue and gains a depth of flavor with vanilla, caramel and spices layered in with the botanicals. Local booze maker Treaty Oak Distilling introduced its Waterloo Antique Gin, aged in new American white oak barrels, in autumn 2013. Now two more Austin distilleries are introducing oak-aged gins in time for summer.

Revolution Spirits introduces Austin Reserve Gin Single Barrel Series
Revolution Spirits, a boutique distillery nestled in the rolling hills just outside Dripping Springs, sold its first bottle of gin on February 22, 2014. That happens to be George Washington’s birthday, who was also a distiller and revolutionary. A fitting coincidence.

Revolution makes its flagship Austin Reserve Gin with a blend of six botanicals that includes juniper, rosemary, lavender, lemon grass, pink pepper corn and Texas grapefruit peel. The 100-proof gin is hand-bottled and every label is hand-numbered.

The folks at Revolution Spirits are constantly experimenting with different distilled spirits, like fruit brandies and the just-released coffee liqueur. That spirit of experimentation led them to try barrel-aged gin.

Co-founder of Mark Shilling describes the first batch of the Austin Reserve Gin Single Barrel Series. “We aged our Austin Reserve Gin in a French oak barrel that was previously used once to oxidize Tempranillo port wine. We aged our Austin Reserve Gin in it for six months and tested it along the way to select the right amount of aging required to get the flavor we want.”

Revolution Spirits will be releasing its Single Barrel Series twice a year with gin aged in different types of barrels. “We might use American, Hungarian, French oak variations that have previously been used for bourbon or mezcal,” says Shilling. “Our second batch is currently aging in a barrel that was previously used to age Jester King Brewery RU55 sour red ale.”

The first batch is a limited run of about 27 cases. It has a lovely light copper, almost salmon, color. Despite the barrel aging, it still smells like gin: prominent juniper and soft floral scents with the added touch of vanilla. Bold botanicals and piney gin flavors of citrus, allspice and pepper layer in with aged flavors of caramel and vanilla. It’s tasty on its own and great in cocktails.

Austin Reserve Gin Single Barrel Series is hitting the shelves of bars and stores in Austin, Houston and Dallas and is available for $45. Try it in a classic Negroni.

Austin Reserve Gin Single Barrel Series Negroni

  • 1 ounce Austin Reserve Gin Single Barrel Series
  • 1 ounce Campari
  • 1 ounce sweet vermouth

Stir gin, Campar and vermouth in an ice-filled tumbler; garnish with orange slice.

Genius Liquids rolls out Oaked Genius Gin

Oaked Genius Gin
Oaked Genius Gin


Mike Groener and his partner Charles Cheung started Genius Gin in the summer of 2013 to fully pursue a torrid love affair with gin. The unassuming distillery, housed in a nondescript industrial area, quietly cranks out some of Austin’s most distinctive gin.

Genius creates its gin by making a neutral spirit by fermenting sugar with yeast. It is then cold-steeped in botanicals and distilled with additional botanicals. Genius comes in a standard 90-proof version and a 114-proof version.

“The creation of our Oaked Gin was a happy accident,” says Mark Toohey, sales manager at Genius. “We ran a batch of gin that wasn’t up to snuff, so we decided to experiment with it. We wanted to try something new and decided an aged gin was the way to go. We considered buying a barrel and then chose to go with chips to see what happened. The result was too good not to bring to market.”

Genius makes its Oaked Gin by steeping the standard gin for six weeks with medium-roast oak chips. Using oak chips exposes the gin to more surface area to let the oak have a speedier impact. Groener likes the way the oak interacts with the botanicals in the gin. After taste-testing the gin, the team settled on a six-week process that gives the gin a nice caramel flavor and rich golden color.

The oak isn’t overpowering and the botanical aromas shine through; juniper and coriander are most prominent. The flavors are all gin up front, sliding right into lovely caramel flavors with a lingering, smooth vanilla finish reminiscent of the Cognac style Groener was aiming for.

“Sipping it straight is the way I like to drink it,” says Toohey. It’s also delightful in cocktails.

Genius initially made a small batch of 12 cases of Oaked Genius Gin; additional batches are being aged right now. The first release is expected to be available in stores around Austin later in July and will sell for $28. Try it in an Old Fashioned.

Oaked Genius Gin Old Fashioned

  • 2 ounces Oaked Genius Gin
  • 4 dashes Angostura Bitters
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 orange wheels
  • 1 maraschino cherry
  • 1 splash club soda

In an Old Fashioned or rocks glass, muddle the bitters, sugar, orange wheel, cherry and a splash of soda. Get rid of the orange rind, add the gin and fill with ice. Make it pretty with a fresh orange wheel and cherry.

This story was originally published on CultureMap.

What are you drinking?

Celebrate Negroni Week with Texas-made gin

Texas Gin for Negroni Week
Texas Gin for Negroni Week


Ah, the Negroni. As sexy as a silky red dress. The folks at Imbibe Magazine and Campari love it so much, they have organized an entire week, Negroni Week, to celebrate it while raising money for charitable causes around the world. This year, the third annual Negroni Week will be held June 1-7 at 33 bars in Austin.

Participating bars will mix Negroni variations and donate a portion of proceeds to a charity of their choice. More than 1,300 bars participated in 2014 and raised more than $120,000 for local charities.

The Negroni cocktail traces its origins to Florence, Italy starting in early 20th century and it has grown to be a staple because of its simplicity and balance of sweet and bitter flavors. The classic recipe is one part each of gin, Campari and sweet vermouth. How could you mess that up?

A great way to show Texas pride is to make Negronis with locally distilled gin. We asked Pam Pritchard, owner of The Tigress Pub, to lead us in a blind tasting of five Texas-made brands of gin including Austin Reserve Gin, Dripping Springs Gin, Genius Gin, Moody June Gin and Waterloo Gin. We tried them straight and in identically made Negronis.

Texas Gin for Negroni Week
Texas Gin for Negroni Week


Each gin had its strengths and the majority were downright delicious. The Waterloo Gin stood out as a favorite in our blind tasting. When blended in the Negronis, the individual botanical recipes of each gin brought out different flavor characteristics of the cocktail. The Austin Reserve Gin showed the best, with a lovely balance of booziness, herbal, citrus, sweet and bitter flavors all in one glass. Yum.

Negroni Blind Tasting
Negroni Blind Tasting


Many bars in town carry one or more of these local gins. In addition, several bars have created special recipes that substitute one or more of the classic ingredients in delicious variations on the Negroni. A few of our favorites include:

  • Rosè Sbagliato at drink.well. a unique twist that includes Amaro Montenegro, rosè vermouth, grapefruit liqueur and sparkling rosè
  • Western Union at East Side Show Room with smoky mezcal, punt e mes and Campari
  • More Cowbell at The Hightower a mixture of Kinsman Rakia, Aperol and Blanc Vermouth
  • The Classic Negronis on tap at Italic
  • Oh Sherry at The Tigress Pub made with Waterloo gin, Contratto vermouth Blanco and Tio Pepe fino sherry
  • The Walking Spanish Midnight Cowboy a delightful concoction of Vago Espadin Elote Mezcal, La Guita Manzanilla Sherry, Bigallet China China Quinquina and grapefruit peel
  • Lemon Verbena gin infused white Negroni at Searsucker
  • Aged Negroni at VOX Table with barrel aged Waterloo Antique Gin, Campari and Cocchi Torino

Participating Bars in Austin:

  • aRoma Italian Kitchen & Bar, 3403 S. Lamar Blvd., Keep Austin Fed
  • Clive Bar, 609 Davis supporting Colon Cancer Coalition
  • CU29, 720 Brazos St., supporting St. Jude’s
  • Cypress Grill, 4404 W. William Cannon, Suite L, Allies Against Slavery
  • District Kitchen and Cocktails,  5900 W. Slaughter Ln. supporting Austin Children’s Services
  • Drink.Well., 207 East 53rd St., supporting Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation
  • East Side Show Room, 1100 E 6th St., supporting Austin Pets Alive
  • Four Seasons Hotel, The Lobby Lounge, 98 San Jacinto Blvd. supporting Helping Hand Home for Children
  • Freedmen’s, 2402 San Gabriel St., supporting American Heart Association
  • Half Step, 75 1/2 Rainey St., supporting Health Alliance for Austin Musicians
  • Italic, 123 W 6th St. supporting Sustainable Food Center
  • King Bee Lounge, 1906 E. 12th St. supporting Safe Place
  • Living Room Bar at The W, 200 Lavaca St., supporting HRC Austin
  • Midnight Cowboy, 313 East 6th St., supporting Capital Area Food Bank
  • North Italia, The Domain 11506 Century Oaks Terrace supporting Lucky Dog Rescue
  • Péché, 208 W. 4th St., supporting Humane Society
  • Rhino Room, 1012 E. 6th St. supporting Austin Pet’s Alive
  • Rio Rita, 1308 E. 6th St. supporting Safe Place
  • School House Pub, 2207 Manor Rd. supporting Helping Hands Home for Children
  • Searsucker, 415 Colorado St., supporting Austin Pets Alive
  • Sputnik, 1300 E 6th St. supporting SafePlace
  • Stay Gold, 1910 East Caesar Chavez supporting SafePlace
  • Swift’s Attic, 315 Congress Ave. supporting Austin Disaster Relief Network
  • The Aristocrat Lounge, 6507 Burnet Rd. supporting SafePlace
  • The Bonneville, 202 W. Cesar Chavez St. supporting Austin Pets Alive
  • The Gatsby, 708 E 6th St., supporting St. Jude’s
  • The Hightower, 1209 East 7th St. supporting ColorCancer
  • The Market, 319 Colorado St. supporting Lupus Foundation
  • The Tigress, 100 W. Northloop Blvd. Unit G, supporting Austin Pets Alive
  • The Townsend, 718 Congress Ave., supporting Health Alliance for Austin Musicians (HAAM)
  • VOX Table, 1100 S. Lamar Blvd., supporting Austin Pets Alive
  • Whisler’s, 1816 E. 6th St., supporting St. Jude Cancer Research and Children’s Hospital
  • Winflo Osteria, 1315 West 6th St. supporting Barmans fund

If you want to participate in the Negroni Week social media action, use the #NegroniWeek hashtag on Instagram and Twitter.

A version of this story was originally published on CultureMap.

Disclosure: The Tigress Pub provided samples of gin and Negroni cocktails at no charge.

What are you drinking? 

There’s a giant Hendrick’s Gin cucumber flying over Austin

Hendrick's Gin Flying CucumberIt’s a bird. It’s a plane. It’s a flying cucumber! That’s right, Hendrick’s Gin has created Hendrick’s Air, a gigantic billboard in the sky. The 130-foot-long, 44-foot-tall blimp nicknamed the Flying Cucumber is visiting Austin this weekend.

The Hendrick’s Flying Cucumber first set sail on April 13 in Los Angeles and will visit San Francisco, Austin, Dallas, South Florida, New Jersey, New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Ann Arbor, Indianapolis and Chicago during its journey. In Austin, the blimp will fly over Levitation Festival, Zilker Park and South Congress. It’s the first booze blimp to grace the skies of Austin.

“Our giant flying cucumber will pay homage to the distinguishing ingredient that makes our gin special. We want to remind our loyalists that Hendrick’s Gin & Tonic deserves the finest cucumber garnish, every time. We hope that this journey will enlighten our imbibers as to the important role the cucumber plays in the Hendrick’s world,” said brand ambassador, Jim Ryan, at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport where the blimp is tethered.

Whether you cast a jaded eye on the massive cucumber or see it as an omen that you must immediately have a cocktail, you have an opportunity to take a flight on the blimp.

“We are able to take a select group of people to ride with us in the Hendricks Flying Cucumber,” says Ryan. “These fellow ‘unusualists’ include loyal drinkers from the industry trade, press, and of course, our fans. Anyone can enter [for] a chance ride in the Flying Cucumber through social media by snapping a photo of it as it soars over Austin and post[ing] it onto Twitter or Instagram using #HendricksGin, #FLYINGCUCUMBER and #CucumberChallenge.”

The dirigible will fly over Austin “slow and low” at a sub-1000-foot cruising altitude from May 8-10. Hendrick’s recommends gathering at one of its viewing spots during the weekend to catch sight of the Flying Cucumber:

  • Friday, May 8, 6-8 pm at Maggie Mae’s
  • Saturday, May 9, 4:30-6:30 pm at Olive and June
  • Sunday, May 10, 7:30-10 pm at the W Hotel, Bar 96 and Bungalow

Only two to three people can ride at one time in the tiny capsule, so you may be lucky to catch a ride. The weather also may play a nasty role in grounding its flight. As of filing time for this story, Hendrick’s was unable to get its cucumber up for the press.

Well, as Mr. Hendricks, er Hendrix said, “Actin’ funny, but I don’t know why. Excuse me while I kiss the sky.”

This story was originally published on CultureMap.

What are you drinking? 

Daniel Barnes of Treaty Oak Distilling Awarded Distiller of the Year

Daniel Barnes, Distiller of the YearI had the privilege of hosting Treaty Oak Distilling’s first ever media event to announce that Daniel Barnes has received the prestigious 2014 Distiller of the Year award by MicroLiquor. He was selected among a field of more than 400 distinguished craft distiller entrants in the United States.

The event felt like a party with friends as a group of bloggers and journalists were greeted on the front porch with a refreshing La Mariquita cocktail made with Graham’s Texas Tea mixed by David Alan, the Tipsy Texan. The group then gathered in the cozy Lenoir dining room to nibble on incredible charcuterie, like octopus pastrami, prepared by Chef Todd Duplechan.

Barnes shared the news of a few more awards that Treaty Oak has collected. It has won:

1. Triple Gold medal in the MicroLiquor Spirit Awards competition for Treaty Oak Barrel Reserve Rum. Treaty Oak Rum is made with molasses sourced from the last sugar mill in Texas, in the Rio Grande Valley that is brewed into rum beer with an initial fermentation that takes four days and then distilled. The Platinum Rum is aged for two years in 60 gallon new American white oak barrels to make the Barrel Reserve Rum.

2. Triple Gold medal in the MicroLiquor Spirit Awards for Waterloo Antique Gin, a barrel aged gin. Waterloo gin was one of the first modern Texas-made gins when it was released at the end of 2011. It’s made with 11 botanicals including juniper, lavender, rosemary, pecans, grapefruit, lemon, and orange zest, coriander, ginger root, licorice root and anise in is a juniper-forward London Dry style gin with a Texas twist. Waterloo Antique Gin is made by aging the original product for a full year in a first-use heavy-charred barrel, giving it rich whisky notes of cinnamon, clove and anise flavors, while letting the juniper and floral flavors come through.

3. The Fifty Best awarded a Double-Gold medal to Graham’s Texas Tea Vodka in the “Best Flavored Vodka” awards for 2014. Graham’s Texas Tea is made with premium Nilgiri tea blended with turbinado sugar, Hill Country water and vodka. Barnes tasted around 50 different teas before picking and Nilgiri because of its intense flavors, strong fragrance and balanced body. It’s starkly different from the American and English breakfast teas.

After describing the awards and how the spirits are made, we all had the opportunity to sip both the Platinum and Barrel Aged Rum side-by-side, followed by  the Waterloo Gin and the Waterloo Antique Gin. Good stuff.

Taste test of Treaty Oak Rum and Waterloo Gin


David Alan showed off his cocktail acumen by preparing a classic daiquiri with Treaty Oak Barrel Aged Rum and a twist on the Old Fashioned made with Waterloo Antique Gin. Both were fantastic.

Treaty Oak Distilling partner, Nate Powell, ended the evening by sharing a little glimpse at what’s next for the distillery.  The current Treaty Oak distillery in north Austin is bursting at the seams. To keep up with demand, Treaty Oak needs a lot more space and a lot more capacity. The company recently broke ground on new facilities that will be located on the 30-acre Ghost Hill Ranch near Dripping Springs right up the road from Jester King Brewery.  Its going to be quite the booze tourism destination featuring a state-of-the-art distillery capable of increasing production allowing the brand to continue to expand nationally, along with a brewery, tasting room and cocktail house.

Thanks Treaty Oak for a fun night of cocktails, nibbles and news.

Disclosure: Treaty Oak Distillery hired me to organize the media event and to provide PR consulting. They did not request this post and are not sponsoring it. 

What Are You Drinking?

New artisan gin joins Dripping Springs’ booming booze barrio

Dripping Springs Tasting Room

The area west of Oak Hill out to Dripping Springs, Texas is quickly becoming a booze barrio. The neighborhood is home to Revolution Spirits, the soon-to-open Deep Eddy Vodka distillery, and a new Treaty Oak Distilling facility that is under construction. San Luis Spirits, the maker of the Dripping Springs Vodka, has just added a new tasting bar and is offering distillery tours.

The distillery, located 25 miles west of Austin, has opened its doors to show off a micro-distilling process using gleaming 50 gallon copper stills. It’s quite a sight to see how they turn corn grown in the Midwest into vodka. As an added bonus, after the guided visit, guests are able to taste the finished goods at the newly installed bar. And hey, you get to keep a branded shot glass, too.

Tours are available each week on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at 1 pm and 3 pm for $10 with a reservation. The tasting bar also sells full-size bottles of Dripping Springs spirits and other swag.

That’s not the only trick up the distillery’s sleeve. San Luis Spirits is expanding its lineup of spirits to add Dripping Springs Gin, officially released September 2. It joins other notable local gins Austin Reserve Gin, Genius Gin and Waterloo Gin in the fight for Austin’s love.

This isn’t the first go at making gin for San Luis Spirits. In the summer of 2011 they partnered with Don Short, former Coca-Cola executive, and Robert Del Grande, James Beard award winning chef, to create Roxor Gin. Unfortunately that product was shelved because of a TABC law that precluded contract distilling. That law has since changed, but it’s too late for Roxor. The good news is the venture helped them learn a lot about making gin.

“The recipe for Dripping Springs Gin is quite different from Roxor,” said Kevin Kelleher, co-owner of San Luis Spirits. “When Roxor ended, we agreed not to do another gin like it. It had 12 different botanicals and Dripping Springs has nine botanicals. We decided to go after four primary notes and do the best job that we can. Our gin has a focus on juniper, but we backed off on traditional juniper forward London Dry style. We use hibiscus for a floral scent, cardamom for spice, and Texas oranges and limes from Mexico to get a bright citrus flavor. We finish it with the artesian spring water with a lot of minerality that cuts the hard edges and makes the gin.”

Dripping Springs Gin is made by steeping the botanicals in Dripping Springs Vodka for 24 hours at 120 proof and then distilling it again. Four of the distillery’s 15 stills are used to make 40-gallon batches for very limited production. Each botanical has different “gravities,” which causes them to distil at different rates. Dripping Springs has worked to ensure it captures the ideal flow from the heart distillation to get the essence of each botanical without over cooking them. The gin then gets a light filtration to remove some of the oil that might make it cloudy.

The finished product is soft, smooth and flavorful. Try it in The Dripping Springs Vesper:

  • 2 ounces Dripping Springs Vodka
  •  2 ounces Dripping Springs Gin
  • .5 ounce Lillet Blanc

Shake ingredients together with ice, strain it into a chilled cocktail glass and serve it garnished with a lemon twist.

A version of this  story was originally published on CultureMap.

What are you drinking? 

19 Austin Bars Celebrate Negroni Week, June 2 – 8

Negroni at Drink.well. This week, Campari and Imbibe bring us Negroni Week, a celebration of a beloved classic cocktail  — and an easy way to raise money for charitable causes. From June 2-8, 17 local bars will donate $1 from every Negroni sold to a charity of the bar’s choice. Who can beat drinking for a good cause?

“We launched Negroni Week last year, and it was a very spur of the moment idea, but within a couple of weeks had over 120 bars and restaurants around the country signed up to donate $1 of every Negroni sale to the charity of their choice,” said Karen Foley, publisher of Imbibe Magazine. “Based on the response, we decided to get more serious about the idea. We partnered with Campari and the US Bartenders Guild to help build the momentum. We now have more than 1,000 bars signed up from around the world.”

The Negroni is an Italian cocktail invented in the early 1900s and typically is served as an aperitif. A classic Negroni is pretty straight-forward. The sexy red drink is simply equal parts gin, Campari and sweet vermouth served with a twist of orange. It’s the perfect yin and yang of sweet and bitter with a boozy spank.

Participating Austin bartenders will mix up their favorite Negroni variations. To kick off Negroni Week, we share our five favorite spots (and a few recipes, too).

Searsucker Austin
Searsucker is tapping a cask of barrel-aged “rum-gronie,” and will serve refreshing drinks for $12. “We are serving drinks from barrel of rum-groni, which I made by aging El Dorado Rum, Comapri and sweet Vermouth in a 20 liter barrel for two months,” said Tyler Naumann, beverage director. “Rum is my favorite spirit to work with and barrel-aged rum is sweet. It goes well with lime and it’s great to drink when it’s hot outside. I used a virgin, first char barrel for this batch. The barrel calms down the bitterness of the Campari and added a smoky vibe that rounds it out in a cool way.”

Searsucker also offers a traditional Negroni made with Fords Gin and a tequila version called Amargo, using Casamigos tequila. Proceeds will benefit Austin Pets Alive!.

With a new mezcal bar, Mezcalería Tobalá, perched upstairs from its main bar, Whisler’s enters Negroni Week with smoky Mexican flair. Rather than the traditional gin, mezcal graces the Whisler’s Negroni. Proceeds will benefit Austin Music Foundation.

The bartenders at this North Loop neighborhood cocktail den will mix three variations on the Negroni including the classic Negroni, the Negroni Fragola and La Conquistadora with proceeds benefiting the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. On Wednesday, Drink.Well. will serve Genius Gin for an all-night happy hour in Negronis for $6 all night.

Negroni Fragola 

  • 1.5 ounce Plymouth Gin
  • .75 ounce strawberry-infused Dolin Blanc vermouth
  • .75 ounce Campari
  • 2 dashes Regan’s Orange bitters

Stirred and served up in a coupe and garnished with a strawberry slice floating on the surface.

W Hotel Austin
The swanky Living Room bars in the W Hotel Austin is mixing three twists on the Negroni cocktail concocted by Living Room bar manager Will Rogers and head libationist Dustin Courtright.

“The exciting thing about Negroni Week is taking a classic cocktail and putting a new spin on it. We’ve loved the Negroni and have had different versions on our menu like a sparkling Negroni with sparkling wine instead of vermouth and also have one with Lillet instead of vermouth. These drinks appeal to the evolving, sophisticated cocktail scene in Austin,” said Rogers. Proceeds from the MacGroni, Innocente and Portuguese Negroni will benefit the Young Chamber of Commerce.


  • 1 ounce The Glenlivet
  • 1 ounce Campari
  • 1 ounce Sweet Vermouth

Served with a lemon twist.

The Bonneville
The Bonneville is introducing The Coqueta, which it describes as a more feminine style Negroni made by substituting Campari with Aperol (slightly less bitter)and topping it with bright and bubbly Prosecco. The drink will benefit PAWS of Austin.

The Coqueta

  • 1 ounce No. 3 Gin
  • 1 ounce Aperol
  • 1 ounce Sweet Vermouth

Top with Prosecco and garnish with bruleed orange slice.

— Update — June 3 additions 

Dozen Street

This new east side bar, located at 12th and Chicon, has thrown its hat into the Negroni ring using the new locally-produced Revolution Austin Reserve Gin. Proceeds will benefit Habitat for Humanity.

A Spirited Revolution

  • 2 ounces Revolution Austin Reserve Gin
  • 1/2 ounce Campari
  • 1/4 ounce St. Germain
  • 3/4 ounce Dolin Sweet Vermouth

Garnish with flamed grapefruit zest.

Participating bars are:

If you want to participate in the Negroni Week social media action, use the #NegroniWeek hashtag on Instagram and Twitter.

This story was originally published on CultureMap.

What are you drinking?

4 after-dinner drink gift ideas for Father’s Day

Blandy's MadieraIn his essay on gifts, Ralph Waldo Emerson poetically asserted that it is better to give a present that reflects the true spirit of the receiver. “… The rule for a gift… is, that we might convey to some person that which properly belonged to his character, and was easily associated with him in thought,” he wrote.

Father’s Day is a great opportunity to put that concept into action. Why not give Dad the gift of a little extra time to reminisce about fond fatherly memories? There is no better accompaniment for a stroll down memory lane than a fine after-dinner drink.

This Father’s Day present him with a bottle of the good stuff and invite him to loiter after dinner and relish in memories of fatherhood, or at least baby making. Here are four recommendations for lovely evening libations that are bound to conjure fond images. Set the tone for Pops by writing one of your favorite memories on the card, or present him with a bottle that is wrapped in a hand written note that simply says, “Linger.”

Memories of how it all started over a glass of Madeira

Before I had kids, I thought the best part of having kids was the part where we got to make them. I still remember that day and the smell of the nape of her neck; a spirited scent of sun kissed daydreams balanced with unrealized intent.

A glass of Madeira is sure to transport him back to fond memories of how fatherhood began. Like a lover, Madeira has the poignant acidic taste of sweat intertwined with the sweetness of honey. It’s created by inserting grape brandy into the fermenting wine and once made, it rests in the heat, letting the flavors cook together.

The venerable Madeira company, Blandy’s, has four distinct varieties of five year old Madeira ranging from dry to sweet sold for $24 each. While each wine is made with different grapes, they are all aged in the cantiero process where it is stored in oak casks in the hot attic of the family’s lodges in Funchal on the island of Madiera, located about 540 miles off the coast of Portugal.

The driest and highest in acidity, Blandy’s Madeira Sercial, has woody apricot, melon and peach flavors with a long nutty finish. It’s light in color like the sun going down in late summer. The second fortified wine in the lineup, Blandy’s Madeira Verdelho, balances acidity with a little bit of residual sugar. It’s a bit rounder, fuller — full of opportunity. It has floral scents and dried fruit, raisin and butter toffee flavors. Both are typically served slightly chilled in white wine glasses as aperitifs, but they are also great as dessert with an assortment of hard cheeses and Lester Young crooning on old vinyl.

Moving up the sweetness scale, Blandy’s Madeira Bual, has a darker amber color and dried fruit, vanilla and wood scents. The sweet raisin and toffee flavors are balanced with acidity. The sweetest in the batch is Blandy’s Madeira Malmsey. The Malmsey is full bodied, dark brown and full of honeyed raisin and almond flavors. Serve this with dark chocolate cake, a red velvet smoking jacket and Lou Reed on the stereo. Let’s hope you won’t have a new brother or sister in nine months.

Grahm's 20 Year Tawny PortRemembering the firsts with port

There is nothing sweeter than the first time baby coos “dada.” I remember that look in your eyes, that delight on your lips as you stroked my chin and called out to me. I am your dad and you knew it. Nothing will ever compare to that first acknowledged connection. Our bond was forever cemented in that moment.

Bring dad back to the sweetness and simplicity of the baby’s first moments with something equally as stirring and sweet without being overly sugary. Port fits that bill. The classic fortified wine has been revered for centuries for its elegance, hefty structure, complex fruit flavors and round sweetness.

A few ports to consider Warre’s Otima 10 Year Old TawnyCockburn’s Special Reserve Porto, and Graham’s 20 Year Tawny Port. The Warre’s Otima, made by the oldest British port company in Portugal, has a lovely rose and tea tawny color with bright cherry flavors rides on top of a racy alcohol engine. It goes for about $26. The Cockburn’s Special Reserve has crazy ripe fruit, lush, velvety texture and is super charged with attitude for $17. If you are willing to spend a little extra — around $63 — go for Graham’s 20 Year Tawny Port.

Graham’s makes this prototypical, classic port with a wine blend that has been aged an average of 20 years in oak barrels giving it vanilla and almond essence layered on top of the raisin and dried orange peel flavors. Serve it slightly chilled in a classic port or white wine glass big enough to let him stick his nose all the way in to breath in the sensuous aromas. The rich tawny loves creamy dessert. Serve it with vanilla ice cream or crème brûlée for a delightful treat that will go well with memories of early parenthood.

The apprentice besting the teacher calls for gin  

He finally did it. Look at him sitting next to the fire with hot chocolate; his smile as bright as the fresh powder and as broad as the first run was steep. He conquered the double black. He did it with grace. He did it 300 yards in front of me. He’s on the edge of being a man. I can’t put him back in the bottle.  

In every father and child relationship, there comes the moment when the child bests the father in skills that the father has taught. That might come first in video games, move into cards and finally into sports and possibly intellectual pursuits. It can be a father’s greatest joy to see his offspring excel. Well, as long as he is manly enough to accept this as a victory.

Gin is a man’s drink that says accomplishment with every sip. It’s the perfect spirit to accompany memories of the first time she beat her dad in chess. Fortunately for us in Austin, Genius Gin is hitting the shelves of local bars and restaurants this month. CEO and president, Mike Groener, is passionate about aesthetics with a tech exec’s attention to detail. He developed a unique flavor profile for Genius Gin using a cold steep in the base for some of the heat-sensitive botanicals like lavender, angelica root, elder flower and lime leaf for a highly aromatic flavor. Others ingredients like juniper, cardamom and coriander are heated in the distillation to impart flavor.

Dad should have a standard 94 proof gin or a 114 proof Navy Strength gin on hand for Father’s Day dinner. The Old Fashioned has been synonymous with American whisky since the early 1800s. Drink.Well.’s owner and bar wizard, Jessica Sanders, puts her stamp on the Old Fashioned by making it with Genius Gin instead of whiskey, which helps to accent the beautiful cardamom notes of the gin. She shared her recipe so you can make it at home.

Gin-based Old Fashioned

  • 2 ounces Genius Gin
  • .25 ounce fich demerara simple syrup (2:1 ratio)
  • 1-2 dashes Scrappy’s cardamom bitters
  • 2 dashes orange bitters
  • Orange peel

Express an orange peel over a double old fashioned glass and drop it in to release the essential oils over the glass. Add simple syrup and bitters. Stir to combine. Add Genius Gin and ice (preferably a large cube to slow dilution). Stir gently until chilled and serve.

Angle's Envy Rye WhiskeyCelebrate coming of age with whiskey

Watching you throw your cap into the air was such a shared moment of pride in your accomplishment. You did it! Your graduation night was the first time we ever drank a bottle of whiskey together. That was a moment, a shift in our relationship from father and child to father and grown child taking on the world together.

Whiskey just feels right as an accompaniment to major milestones. Its simplicity, its carmely sweetness, its bracing alcohol burn that reminds you of the flame of life. Treat it with respect and it pays you back with a contented grin.

Angel’s Envy has introduced a limited release Rye whiskey just in time for Father’s Day, and it is available in less than a dozen states, including Texas. Master distiller, Lincoln Henderson, uses 95 percent rye and 5 percent malted barley and ages the whiskey for at least six years in oak barrels. It is then finished for 18 months in Caribbean rum casks, which began as French cognac barrels. The result is a fun mix of the spicy and earthy rye notes along with vanilla, sherry and hazelnut flavors with a touch of sweetness from the rum barrels.

It’s a smooth finished to dinner, even at 100 proof, so serve it neat or with a set of frozen stones rather than ice. This will set you back about $70, but your dad is worth it.

No matter which bottle you choose or which memory you hope to evoke, give your dad the gift of a little extra time to remember why he loves being a father.

This article was previously published on CultureMap.

Disclosure: Samples were provided for review at no cost and with no expectation of coverage. 

What are you drinking? 

GIN CITY: Refreshing drinks from three local gin distillers

Summer calls for a cocktail as light and sassy as the skimpy sundress hugging the shape of the hottie sitting on the barstool next to you. What you need is a cocktail with flavors as complex as the floral pattern on that sundress. You need a cocktail made with gin. Yes, gin. It’s like vodka, but with flavor.

Gin is the stuff that Bond drinks. Gin is the stuff that bootleggers surreptitiously made to thumb their nose at the absurdity of Prohibition. Gin is the stuff that has captured the imagination of a whole new wave of craft distillers. Gin is the stuff that is both bold and elegant enough to capture the attention of that lady in the sundress. Fortunately there are new Texas-made gins being introduced just in time for summer. Let’s declare it the “Summer of Gin.”


The man behind Treaty Oak Distilling, Daniel Barnes, decided to dis till gin two years ago because he wants to make spirits that intrigue him.

“Gin shows off the craft ability of a distiller with playfulness and uniqueness,” Barnes says. “Distillers have the ability to control the flavors and display their personalities. That, and we really like gin.”

Waterloo gin was one of the first modern Texas-made gins when it was released at the end of 2011. It is made with a neutral base spirit made from corn and wheat—sort of like vodka. The base liquor is then put back into a copper pot still to go through another round of distillation, but this time with a stainless-steel basket crammed full of 11 botanicals in the column of the still above the vaporizing pot. The alcohol vapors circulate in botanicals six to eight times, grabbing the intricate flavors of each ingredient.

Daniel Barnes Waterloo gin Barnes and his head distiller, Chris Lamb, experimented with almost 50 different recipes before they found the exact flavor profile they liked. Waterloo is made with a mix of Texas-grown botanicals such as lavender, rosemary, pecans, citrus from the Rio Grande Valley grapefruit, lemon, and orange zest along with juniper, coriander, ginger root, licorice root and anise. That mix of botanicals gives Waterloo the up-front juniper punch of a traditional London Dry style with a little Texas on the palate.

The very name, Waterloo, ties London and Austin together. After that smack of juniper it eases into a long lick of honey from the lavender, piney bitterness, nutshell and mischievous citrus. Some people compare it to Hendrix in style, but with less citrus and cucumber. The folks at Treaty Oak have a fantastic treat up their sleeve: aged gin. The Waterloo Antique series will be available in July. While barrel-aged gins have been a hot trend with some craft distillers, this will be the first one made in Texas.

Barnes had a gleam in his eye when he Daniel Barnes, of Treaty Oak Distilling described Antique while showing me around the barrel room.

“What happens when you give a bold gin a full year in a first-use heavy-charred barrel?” he asks me. “It gets rich whisky notes of cinnamon, clove, anise flavors. The juniper and floral still come through, but it has a nice round, caramelly finish. We are bottling it at 94 proof, so it has heft but is approachable straight out of the bottle. It also makes an amazing old-fashioned with quality orange and grapefruit bitters.”

Moonshine makes a fantastic cocktail to highlight the classic flavors of the un-aged Waterloo gin, which is the namesake of the original structure, the Waterloo Compound. Waterloo Gin is sold for around $25 a bottle in retail shops in Louisiana, Oklahoma, Illinois and Texas. It will soon be available in New York and California. It’s also poured in bars and restaurants around Austin, including Lucy’s Fried Chicken, Moonshine, the Four Seasons, Jack Allen’s Kitchen, Bartlett’s and Hopdoddy.


The newest gin to hit the market in Texas this June is Genius Gin. CEO and President Mike Groener and his partner, Charles Cheung, started the development of Genius in April 2012 because, as he put it, they “really, really love gin.” That’s one hell of a good reason to make it. Groener is passionate about aesthetics and has an engineer’s attention to detail. He established the flavor profile over the course of a year, experimenting with various ingredients.

“Being a craft distiller, I had a chance to show my style in the taste profile. It’s a way to both create an experience for the customer and put my distinct mark on the brand,” he says.

Despite the tinkering, the original recipe just wasn’t right. He visited several distilleries including Aviation in Portland for inspiration and realized that they had a similar characteristic to his recipe—a characteristic he didn’t like.

“There was a low note to some of them that tasted too rustic,” Groener says. “It wasn’t beautiful. The gins didn’t go well in cocktails. When I returned from Portland, I revamped my recipe and was done with it in about a week.”

Groener prides himself on the handmade qualities of his gin and fastidiously makes a flavor-neutral base spirit from sugar to let the botanicals do the talking. He uses a cold steep in the base for some of the heat-sensitive botanicals like lavender, angelica root, elder flower and lime leaf for a highly aromatic flavor. Other ingredients like juniper, cardamom and coriander (and two secret ones) are meant to be heated up —and even toasted, to impart flavor. Groener distills the heat-loving botanicals and the steeped spirits to make both a standard 94 gin and a 114-proof Navy Strength gin (Navy Strength gets its name from the practice that the British Royal Navy employed of taking gin of at least 57 percent alcohol on its boats, because if it were spilled on gun powder, the gun powder was still useable).

That attention to detail resulted in well-integrated flavors with the juniper sliding smoothly across the entire palate accompanied by a subtle sweetness. The Navy Strength has a slight nuttiness from the roasted coriander, and the higher alcohol gives it the vibrancy of sucking on a fistful of gin-flavored Altoids. While it can be appreciated straight up in a martini, it’s also versatile enough to go into a variety of cocktails. Groener mixed two cocktails using fresh-squeezed juices to taste cocktails and homemade simple syrups.

When Genius is released in June, it will be available in Austin, Dallas, Houston and San Antonio at retail stores such as The Austin Wine Merchant, Specs and Twin Liquors, as well as bars and restaurants such as Drink.Well, Midnight Cowboy, Volstead, Grackle, Tigress Pub, the Four Seasons and Vespaio.
Revolution Gin


After nearly five years of dreaming, scheming, planning and experimenting, Revolution Gin cofounders Aaron Day and Mark Shilling are nearly ready to introduce their craft distilled gin to Texas.

“Aaron and I had been talking about our desire to make a spirit for awhile, and one thing led to another and we decided to stop talking about it and do it,” Shilling says. “Gin is what we want to do first. Craft distilling is wide open to experimentation, with flavors and styles that the big guys can’t do.”

“We were inspired by what we are seeing in the craft distilling industry,” Day quickly adds. “Tito [Beveridge, of Tito’s Handmade Vodka] showed it can be done. [Dan Garrison, of Garrison Brothers Whiskey] showed that it can be done in a craft way.”

The two choose to seek the counsel of other distillers and found an eager group of mentors willing to share advice. (In fact, the meetings and conversations led to the formation of the Texas Craft Distillers trade association, of which Daniel Barnes is president.)

“The mentorship we’ve received has helped us get off the ground,” Shilling says. “We had many productive conversations, and now it’s off to the races.”

Revolution Gin has secured a site for its distillery near Dripping Springs, in the same neighborhood as Argus Hard Cidery, Jester King Brewery and Thirty Planet Brewing Company. They see the area as a cultural corridor leading from Austin to the wineries near Fredericksburg. They aren’t alone in thinking that the area has appeal for day-trippers and tourists alike. Treaty Oak Distilling plans to move its operations to the neighborhood this fall. The gin is in the planning stages as Revolution works on getting its license.

The intent is to make a neutral base spirit with red wheat—or may even use non-GMO corn to make a gluten-free base that is consistent and reliable so they can focus on the botanicals. To gather inspiration for the flavor profile, Revolution has met with bartenders and opinion makers, including the folks at Bar Congress and Bobby Huegle of Anvil Bar in Houston to better understand the specific style of gin that is wanted in Texas.

“Simple is sometimes better. We are looking at using seven botanicals in our gin,” Shilling says. The focus will be on Texas-sourced botanicals such as citrus, lavender, rosemary and Ashe juniper berries. Revolution is shooting for a continental style, rather than a London dry, that brings complexity to cocktails. The star of the botanical show will be rosemary.

“Rosemary is distinct and has real legs,” Day says. “We’re excited to see what that brings.”

Revolution expects to release its gin in area restaurants, bars and stores in early fall for about $30. To get the word out to prominent mixologists, they hired an experienced spirits broker, Jennifer Querbes, as partner and COO. What are you waiting for? Let the Summer of Gin begin.

Summer Teeth
While Revolution Gin isn’t yet available to taste, Jason Stevens, the bar manager at Bar Congress, created a special gin-based summer cocktail that he’ll mix for you using any Texas-made gin.

  • 1 1/2 ounces local gin
  • 1/2 ounce Gran Classico
  • 1/2 ounce dry Sherry (like Fino, Manzanilla or Amontillado)
  • 1 barspoon simple syrup
  • 1 ounce fresh-squeezed Rio Star Grapefruit Juice
  • 1/4 ounce lemon juice
  • few drops Bitter Truth Celery Bitters
  • 1 ½ ounces soda water (optional)

Combine all in a shaker filled with ice, and shake briefly to integrate.

*For a boozier cocktail, double strain into an old -fashioned glass filled with cubed ice. Garnish with a grapefruit peel.
*For a lighter, more refreshing cocktail, single-strain shaken cocktail into a Collins glass filled with crushed ice and top with soda, then stir to integrate. Garnish with grapefruit peel and fresh mint.

Strawberry-lime Rickey
Waterloo Gin goes well in a refreshing twist on a classic Rickey. Try it with fresh strawberry.

  • 3 large, ripe strawberries
  • half a lime cut into quarters
  • 1/2 ounce simple syrup
  • 2 ounces Waterloo Gin
  • lime wheel, for garnish
  • strawberry slice, for garnish

In the bottom of a mixing glass, muddle the strawberries, lime wedges and simple syrup. Add the gin and shake vigorously with ice to chill. Strain into an Old Fashioned glass over fresh ice. Garnish with the lime wheel and strawberry slice.


Gin Fitzgerald
This classic cocktail is light, fresh and tasty. The gin flavor is a little bit up front so you can appreciate it, but it is as delicate as a first kiss. This could be the drink of the summer.

  • 2 ounces gin
  • 3/4 ounce lemon juice
  • 1/2 ounce simple syrup
  • 2 dashes Angostura bitters (no more!)

Shake over ice and serve it up with a lemon garnish.



Liberty Tavern in the Hilton Austin has a keen eye for local beer and spirits. They have introduced new summer cocktails, including the Bergstrom made with Waterloo Gin.

  • Lime Juice – 1 oz
  • Waterloo Gin – 2 oz
  • Maraschino Cherries – 3
  • Simple Syrup – ½ teaspoon

Shake and serve on ice.

This story was originally published in the Summer issue of Austin Man magazine. Photos by Jojo Marion.

What are you drinking? 



Great Gatsby Inspired Gin Cocktails

The other night I had an insanely disturbing dream. I woke up panicked in a pool of sweat. I dreamt that I was living during the height of Prohibition, and couldn’t get a drop to drink. Gasp!

Apparently not everyone suffered without a drink during Prohibition in the roaring ’20s.  In the remake of  the movie based on F. Scott Fitzgerald’s great American novel, The Great Gatsby, Jay Gatsby  who is played by Leonardo DiCaprio, the booze is readily flowing. The boot-leggin adventures splash around the story, but the only cocktail called out by name in the book is the classic Gin Rickey.

Coincident with the opening of the movie, Tanqueray Gin brand ambassador, Angus Winchester, rolled into Austin to give a history lesson on the lovely spirit and pimp his version of “Dutch courage,” aka gin (gin is enjoying a resurgence in the past few years. Watch for my story on Texas gins on June 1.)

Mr. Winchester poured us tastes of Tanqueray London Dry, Tanqueray Ten and Tanqueray Rangpur, made from the Indian rangpur lime, as well as mixed a couple cocktails to show off the versatility of gin. The main botanical in gin, juniper, will jump in bed with any flavor. It snuggles up to sweet fruit juices, puckers with sharp citrus flavors and fondles bitter flavors like Campari.

So what does that have to do with The Great Gatsby? Bathtub gin was purportedly all the rage during Prohibition and it’s rumored that the well-heeled got their grubby mitts imported gins like Tanqueray by delivery of floatable cases.

If you are feeling a bit nostalgic after watching the flick, skip getting the pixie flapper haircut that Carey Mulligan is sporting and instead try a few of these classic Prohibition-era gin cocktails with recipes courtesy of our friends at Tangueray.

Gin Rickey

Said to be the preferred pour of F. Scott Fitzgerald, this simple serve is best imbibed on a hot summer day. Don’t forget the chunky ice cubes.

  • 1.25 ounces Tanqueray London Dry gin
  • 1 ounce lime juice
  • 5 parts soda water

Build in a highball glass, stir, top with soda water. Drag to mix and garnish with a lime wedge.

French 75

This snappy little champagne cocktail’s claim to fame is that it’s the only drink in the classic canon created during Prohibition.

  • 1.25 ounces Tanqueray Ten
  • 0.5 ounce simple
  • 0.5 ounce lemon juice
  • Top with champagne

Shake and strain into a rocks glass and top with champagne. 

White Lady

Introduced in the late 20’s, The White Lady was born from the drink the “Delilah,” which included crème de menthe. The Savoy’s Harry Craddock replaced it with orange liqueur and it became an instant classic.

  • 1.5 ounces Tanqueray London Dry Gin
  • .75 ounce orange liqueur
  • .75 ounces lemon juice

Pour all of the ingredients into a shaker, fill with ice, shake and strain into a chilled coupe glass.

The Southside

The Southside is the signature cocktail at the legendary former speakeasy the 21 Club. It’s also said to be the favorite drink of notorious Prohibition-era bootlegger Al Capone and his gang.

  • 1.25 ounces Tanqueray Ten
  • 0.5 ounce lime juice
  • 0.5 ounce simple
  • 2 sprigs of mint
  • Soda

Muddle one mint sprig with lime & simple. Add Tanqueray and shake well. Pour into glass over crushed ice and stir until the outside of the glass frosts. Top with soda and garnish with sprig of mint.

The Franklin
Let’s not forget Franklin Delano Roosevelt famously celebrated the end of Prohibition with a dirty gin martini. Whether it was with Tanqueray – one of the few gins today that was in production in the 30s – or not is lost to history, but this classic cocktail ushered in a new era of American drinking.

  • 1.5 ounces Tanqueray London Dry Gin
  • 1 tbsp dry vermouth
  • 2 tbsp olive juice
  • 2 olives

 Fill a mixer with all ingredients including the olives. Cover and shake hard 3 – 4 times. Strain contents of the mixer into the cocktail glass. Garnish with an olive.

Thank god my nightmare isn’t real and I don’t have to buy gin from bootleggers. I’ll be mixing these all summer. Drop by and join me.

What are you drinking?

The First Gin Born in Texas: ROXOR

Roxor:   adjective – Roxorz, Roxored. Definition: Variation of the word Rocks. Using the slang definition meaning something that is good, or great, or awesome. Usually found when playing online games.

“Dude, I roxor at counter strike, no one can beat me!”Source: Urban Dictionary

Roxor; a palindrome and a declaration of awesomeness. Does this new Gin live up to its name? Hell yeah.

Gary and Kevin Kelleher, owners of San Luis Spirits, the makers of Dripping Springs Vodka, had always wanted to branch out beyond vodka. Gin is a logical choice, as its one of the great spirits of the world, so Gary started working on a recipe. While they were in the exploratory phase they got a call from Don Short, former Coca-Cola executive, and Robert Del Grande, James Beard award winning chef – principals in New Artisan Spirits. It turns out they were interested in creating a new Gin made at the San Luis Spirits distillery. It was meant to be. After a 15 month gestation, the collaboration resulted in the birth of Roxor Artisan Gin, the first Gin made in Texas.

Gary Kelleher gave me a run-down of how Roxor came to be. Del Grande, who in addition to being a brilliant chef also holds a PhD in Bio-chemistry, brought a creative new recipe to the brothers Kelleher for production in the ultra-pure the Dripping Springs process.  Gary tells me that the key thing to making a great Gin is the combination of botanicals, the freshness of the botanicals, the steep time and the temperature of steeping.

There are several ways Gin can be formulated and distilled from a starting point. They tried various methods for steeping and multiple methods of distillation including, cold filtered method, to get the right flavor profile. They found a particular steeping method to capture the freshness of the ingredients including juniper berries, freshly grated Texas grapefruit zest, fresh Texas limes and a blend of botanicals including hibiscus and Texas pecans.  What? Hibiscus and pecans? That’s right, the recipe is completely unique.

The team wanted a more balanced flavor than the traditional piney, juniper-forward London dry style of Gin. They worked to refine the recipe to bring out the brightest flavor and not overly dominated by the pine needle flavor of juniper. While many Gins use citrus peals, Roxor stands alone in its dedication to using fresh Texas ingredients to give it a character that screams Texas.

Gary recommends drink this Gin chilled and neat to get the true flavor profile. If you’re not a fan of straight Gin, Roxor mixes incredibly well with a variety of mixers including the traditional tonic, which still lets the vibrant flavors come through. Gary is fond of making a Martini with Roxor and Lillet Blanc instead of vermouth to get a classic Martini profile with brightness and range of flavors.

I tasted it chilled, served neat in a snifter to get the full aromatics and unadulterated flavor. Here’s what it tastes like.

Look Crystal clear like pure spring water, with ample viscosity and tight tears.
Smell Bursts of juniper berries dance with alcoholic heat followed by soft citrus and lavender undertones. The alcohol intensity mellowed nicely as it rested.
Taste The approach is ruled by warm juniper that eases into clean grapefruit, cinnamon and walnut. Bright as a chiming bell and as layered as a gospel choir, it doesn’t need a lemon twist garnish with all of that sunny citrus. It’s both sweet and bitter at the same time. The mouthfeel is glycerin smooth with just enough heat on the throat to remind you that it’s 90 proof.


My initial reaction on the first taste was, “oh my goodness. Yum! Dude, this is so roxor.” I mixed a second glass with tonic, and sure enough the citrus aromatics and complexity shone through.

Are you ready to try it? Be patient. It is just at the beginning to roll out in a few select liquor stores in Texas and will hit the shelves more broadly state-wide later in June. Because it’s a unique product, New Artisan Spirits has given samples to a number of prominent mixologists in Dallas/Ft. Worth, Houston, San Antonio and Austin to create their own signature craft cocktails. I’m going to check in at Haddingtons and Bar Congress to see if they mix it with their hand-made tonic. I bet Péché and Trace at the W Hotel will come up with some unique cocktails too.

If you live outside of Texas, you’ll have to come here to try it. There are currently no plans to distribute Roxor beyond the state of Texas. Because this is an artisan spirit, it is labor intensive and time consuming to make. Think of all the grapefruits and limes that have to peel off their clothes just to keep you happy. To make this limited production Gin, Dripping Springs added special designated stills and steeping urns at the distillery. Production in the first year will be probably less than 5,000 cases, which will only slake the thirst of happy Texans. I’m damn glad to be one of them.

New Artisan Spirits provided a sample of Roxor for this review.

What are you drinking?